11th Annual International

Pediatric Feeding
Disorder Conference

Live April 24-26, 2024
On Demand April 29-May 28, 2024

Add event to calendar

Agenda

All times listed in Eastern Time (New York)

Agenda


Day 1

April 24, 2024 11:30

This session, led by two mothers of children with pediatric feeding disorder, will showcase the case studies of two incredible children navigating the challenges of pediatric feeding disorder. Hear first hand accounts of medically complex children, insider perspectives of mothers who also have careers in health, and the effects of peer to peer mentoring on creating a shared narrative during a critically isolating experience. 

Learning Objectives

  1. List two obstacles parents face when guiding their child through their pediatric feeding disorder journey
  2.  Describe two benefits of a peer to peer mentorship program and it’s effects on maternal mental health
  3.  Generalize outcomes of a peer to peer mentorship program in relation to pediatric feeding disorder and its effects on the family
speaker headshot

Jena Twete, MS, CSCS
Special Olympics Colorado

speaker headshot

Cassidy Martinez, RN, BSN
Aveanna Healthcare

April 24, 2024 12:00

Feeding Matters’ Shannon Goldwater Summit for Change understands that for optimal outcomes to be achieved it must be a team effort, which includes families. Families, professionals, and community partners will engage in dialogue to address pressing issues related to episodic care such as duration of care, breaks in service, treatment approaches, and insurance coverage through the use of case studies, panel discussions, and resource dissemination. This event will focus on meeting families exactly where they are while providing tangible, immediate, next steps to move forward and progress in their PFD journey. 

Learning Objectives

  1. List 2 obstacles PFD families face when seeking care
  2. Define episodic care in treatment of children with PFD
  3. Describe at least 3 available PFD resources that can be shared with a care team
  4. Describe at least 2 methods for advocating for care when faced with insurance barriers 
  5. List the steps need to appeal an insurance denial for initial or ongoing service
speaker headshot

Ruth Bourque, MS, OTR/L
Memorial Health

speaker headshot

Jenny McGlothin, MS, CCC/SLP, CLC
UT Dallas Callier Center for Communication Disorders

speaker headshot

Cuyler Romeo, MOT, OTR/L, SCFES, IBCLC
Feeding Matters, Banner University Medical Center-Tucson

speaker headshot

Dana Kizer, MS, OTR/L, BCP, Family Advocate
Texas Children's Hospital; Feeding and Swallowing Specialists of The Woodlands

speaker headshot

Amber Mieras, FAC Chair, Parent of Child with PFD

speaker headshot

Deanna Montalbano, Content Expert
Desert Valley Pediatric Therapy

speaker headshot

Toneisha Bush, MA, CCC-SLP
AMN Healthcare; The Flower Institute

speaker headshot

Grant Morris, MD, MPH, FAAP, FAC member, Parent of Child with PFD
Geisinger Health System

Day 2

April 25, 2024 09:00

Feeding skills are more than meets the eye. Delve into the intricate world of neurophysiology as it relates to swallowing across the lifespan, a crucial aspect in navigating the complexity of pediatric feeding disorder (PFD). Join us in this keynote to broaden your insights into swallow neurophysiology, discover effective methods for improving outcomes in children with PFD, and explore cutting-edge technologies shaping the future of PFD management.  The question lingers: Can neuroscience be the key to advancing PFD treatment?

Learning Objectives

  1. Summarize the levels of swallowing neural control and how they change in development and across the life span
  2. Describe applications of neuroscientific principles and findings into pediatric feeding and swallowing clinical care
  3. Describe the role of new technologies in improving understanding of pediatric swallowing neurophysiology and treatment of pediatric feeding disorder
speaker headshot

Georgia A. Malandraki, PhD, CCC-SLP, BCS-S, F-ASHA
Purdue University

April 25, 2024 10:30

Effects of Infant-Driven Feeding in the NICU for Premature Infants with Comorbidities

Historically, premature infant oral feeding attainment was considered a function of gestational age(GA)/neurodevelopmental maturity only. However, some researchers suggest comorbidities have greater impact; others report feeding method has the greatest impact. This study investigated relationships between GA, morbidities, and feeding method on time to full oral feeding in preterm infants.

Learning Objectives

  1. Demonstrate a functional knowledge of the effects of prematurity and comorbidities on swallowing
  2. Explain feeding factors that impact swallowing in premature infants
  3. Describe the rationale for a proposed new premature infant gestational age classification schema

_____________________________________

Physiological Measures of Breastfeeding: A comparison between Term vs Pre-Term Infants

The presentation discusses the biomechanics of breastfeeding as a complex and critical neurophysiological function for newborn babies. The session describes physiological measures of breastfeeding that can be obtained from infants non-invasively. The presentation reports findings from a comparison of objective physiological measures of breastfeeding between term and preterm infants.

Learning Objectives

  1. Describe neuro-physiological manifestations associated with prematurity resulting in feeding disorders
  2. Summarize a non-invasive clinical approach to obtain physiological measures of breastfeeding in infants
  3. Compare and contrast the biomechanics of breastfeeding in term and preterm infants

_____________________________________

Feeding Challenges for Infants of Diabetic Mothers, a Research Review

During the presentation, results of the literature review researching oral feeding difficulties in infants of diabetic mothers (IDMs) will be shared. Participants will be provided an overview of oral feeding complications that may arise in IDMs. Feeding treatment methods currently utilized will be discussed by a neonatologist and speech pathologist.

Learning Objectives

  1. Describe the impact maternal diabetes can have on infant physiology
  2. Examine common factors affecting the infant of a diabetic mother’s ability to orally feed
  3. Identify and assess therapeutic treatment strategies to improve oral feeding of infants of diabetic mothers
speaker headshot

Courtney Green, MS, CF-SLP
RUSH Kids Pediatric Therapy & RUSH Copley Medical Center

speaker headshot

Leslie-Ann Dietrich MD, IBCLC
University of Texas Health San Antonio

speaker headshot

Isuru Dharmarathna, PhD
KITE, Toronto Rehabilitation Research Institute, University Health Network, Canada

speaker headshot

Buddhika Prasangi, BSc Honours
Miracle L Speech and Hearing Center, Battaramulla, Sri Lanka.

speaker headshot

Melanie Van Hoy, MS, CCC-SLP, CLC, CNT, NTMTC
Therapy 2000

April 25, 2024 10:30

Discriminant Validity of the Environment, Attitudes, Temperament, Sensory (EATS) Feeding Assessment

The Environment, Attitudes, Temperament, and Sensory (EATS) Feeding Assessment was created to evaluate pediatric sensory-based feeding difficulties in an outpatient setting. Caregivers of children with and without feeding difficulties were surveyed and compared statistically. This research determined the discriminant validity of the EATS Feeding Assessment (p<.01) to be adequate.

Learning Objectives

  1. Describe sensory-based feeding
  2. Summarize two components of sensory- based feeding difficulties
  3. List two examples of differentiation between seeking and avoiding sensory-based feeding difficulties

_____________________________________

Psychometric Properties of SMART Feeding Tool: An Interprofessional Research Study

Feeding difficulties are a frequent complication of prematurity. Infant feeding assessment tools with well-established validity and reliability are lacking in the literature. This led to an inter-professional partnership among NICU providers to develop and test the psychometric properties of a novel infant feeding assessment tool: the SMART Tool.

Learning Objectives

  1. Describe the impact of feeding difficulties on the neonatal patient population
  2. Summarize the benefits of infant feeding assessment tools
  3. Identify one outcome of the study testing the psychometrics of the SMART Tool

_____________________________________

Comorbidities in Paediatric Feeding Disorders

Drawing on new data from a retrospective observational study, a multi-disciplinary team examine the prevalence of comorbidities in PFD. We share findings on the prevalence of allergies, gastrointestinal disorders, neurodevelopmental conditions, nutritional deficiencies, medical conditions, mental health conditions and sensory processing disorders in PFD, discussing the impact for clinical practise.

Learning Objectives

  1. Identify two common comorbidities associated with Paediatric Feeding Disorders and their prevalence
  2. Summarize how comorbid conditions contribute to feeding difficulties
  3. Desribe two ways to Implement changes in treatment for PFD to incorporate challenges related to comorbidities
speaker headshot

Blair Carsone, PhD, MOT, OTR/L
Gannon University, Kids SPOT, and Carsone KIDS

speaker headshot

Bryce Smith, OTD, OTR/L
CarsoneKIDS, Inc.

speaker headshot

Anne Albi, MS, CCC-SLP, IBCLC
Advocate Health, co-owner of Lactation Care Connection, LLC

speaker headshot

Hannah Daw, MSc (RD)
The Feeding Trust

speaker headshot

Ravi Mishra, MD, FAAP
Advocate Health

speaker headshot

Lucy Bates, Bsc (Hons) (OT)
The Feeding Trust; Lucy Bates Children’s OT Ltd

speaker headshot

Cynthia Lira-Crame, MSN, RNC-NIC, NPD-BC
Advocate Illinois Masonic Medical Center

speaker headshot

Natalie Morris, MSc, BA (Hons) (SLP)
The Feeding Trust & Integrated Therapy Solutions Ltd

April 25, 2024 12:30

Parent feeding practices in the NICU are influenced by social determinants of health (SDOH), ranging from transportation to cultural beliefs and values to hospital visitation policies and access to services at discharge. This session explores a case study highlighting opportunities to reduce barriers to parent feeding by actively addressing SDOH.

Learning Objectives

  1. List two ways social determinants of health influence outcomes related to parent feeding in the NICU
  2. Identify, consider, and address social determinant of health-related barriers in current practice patterns and policies
  3. Create a plan for supporting unmet needs related to parent feeding during hospitalization and discharge
speaker headshot

Stefanie LaManna, MS, CCC-SLP, CNT
American Speech-Language Hearing Association

speaker headshot

Brooke Hatfield, MS, CCC-SLP
American Speech-Language Hearing Association

April 25, 2024 12:30

School meals are more than nutrition. This presentation will explore the various ways that families, health care professionals, and school personnel can collaborate to create safe and inclusive mealtime experiences for students with PFD. Participants will learn about policies and share strategies for receiving support in their communities.

Learning Objectives

  1. Summarize the USDA recommendations and/or mandates for school meals
  2. Identify two examples of school responsibility for safety and inclusion during meals at schools
  3. Compare and contrast personal and perceived communication strategies with families, school professionals, and healthcare personnel
speaker headshot

Lily Gullion, OTR/L (PhD Student at UNC- Chapel Hill)
University of North Carolina Chapel Hill

April 25, 2024 13:45

In many families only one adult has been trained to tube feed their child, which can be stressful and isolating. Working with carers, for carers we co-created and evaluated a free education package that aims to safely increase carer expertise and agency in tube feeding including tube-positive values.

Learning Objectives

  1. Identify two risks to carers and children from having limited tube training outside healthcare settings
  2. Describe the impact of co-creating tube education with both carers and clinicians
  3. Summarize the role of "tube positive" values in feeding-tube education
speaker headshot

Chris Elliot, B.Med (Hons) FRACP
Consultant Pediatrician

speaker headshot

Anna Ierardo, Parent
SUCCEED Child Feeding Alliance

speaker headshot

Nick Hopwood, BA (Hons) MsC PhD MD (Honoris Causa)
University of Technology Sydney

April 25, 2024 13:45

No known service exists that targets parent understanding of Pediatric Feeding Disorder (PFD). This presentation will describe the challenges with parent understanding of PFD, help attendees evaluate their own practices in relation to these challenges, and share a novel program, the ABCs of Feeding, that aims to support their understanding.

Learning Objectives

1. Identify 3 common misconceptions or challenges to understanding PFD

2. Examine practices to identify areas (considering common misconceptions) where parents may need additional knowledge/support

3. Describe 3 intervention sessions for parents to gain more information about PFD

speaker headshot

Adina Seidenfeld, PhD
Nationwide Children's Hospital; Ohio State University

April 25, 2024 15:00

Important Evidence-Based Practice Factors to Consider in Pediatric Feeding Disorders

The current state of evidence-based practice (EBP) in speech-language pathology’s scope of practice in the management of pediatric feeding disorders will be reviewed. Barriers, facilitators, and consideration of other related factors to EBP components (i.e., research evidence, clinical experience, and client perspectives) will be discussed.

Learning Objectives

  1. Describe the components of evidence-based practice and support its value
  2. Identify clinician-, research-, and institutional-related barriers to evidence- based practice
  3. Summarize the effects that caregivers and multidisciplinary collaboration have on evidence-based practice

_____________________________________

Using Parent-Reported Tools in Assessment for Pediatric Feeding Disorder (PFD)

This session will provide a practical overview of Patient Reported Outcome Measures (PROMs) in assessment for children with Pediatric Feeding Disorder (PFD). We will review the content, application, and interpretation of different PROMs across several case studies, and learn how to critique appropriate PROMs.

Learning Objectives

  1. Describe the content and application of a Patient (or parent-proxy) Reported Outcome Measure (PROM)
  2. List two PROMs available for Pediatric Feeding Disorder (PFD) in children
  3. Compare and Contrast existing PROMs for children with PFD

__________________________________

Examining the Association between Maternal Postpartum Stress and Infant Non-Nutritive Suck

To determine the association between maternal postpartum perceived stress and infant non-nutritive suck (NNS) at 3 months. Maternal postpartum perceived stress was associated with reduced NNS burst activity, indicating that mother’s who reported higher stress had infants with fewer suck bursts. This is consistent with prior prenatal research.

Learning Objectives

  1. Describe non-nutritive suck and how it has been used to assess infant neurofunction
  2. Summarize the association between infant non nutritive suck and maternal postpartum perceived stress
  3. Use results to inform clinical practice and consider how maternal stress may influence early feeding

_____________________________________

Feeding Therapy Interventions and Frequency of Use: A Pilot Study

This presentation explores a new pilot study being conducted with the goal of determining the most frequently used feeding therapy interventions in an outpatient feeding clinic. This research will provide a foundation for future studies regarding treatment approaches, and provide evidence to support feeding therapy treatment for children with PFD.

Learning Objectives

  1. Identify two gaps in the evidence based treatment of PFD
  2. Describe three interventions identified by feeding therapists as the most commonly used in feeding therapy
  3. Summarize the procedural steps involved in development of a pilot study

__________________________________

Mealtime Reimagined: Initiating a Sensory Feeding Group with Medically Complex Children

Medically complex children requiring extensive hospitalization and supplemental means of nutrition often are unable to participate in traditional mealtime experiences. This session will provide education on how to create a collaborative, evidence-based sensory feeding group targeting the mealtime experience, sensory exploration, and developmental feeding skills while accounting for medical acuity.

Learning Objectives

  1. Identify appropriate sensory-feeding goals for medically complex children relying on alternate means of nutrition
  2. List two protocols for medically complex pediatric patients targeting developmental feeding and mealtime experience
  3. Summarize precautions and contraindications of working with medically complex patients in a feeding group setting

_____________________________________

Chewing in Minimally Verbal and Verbal Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

This study looks at chewing in minimally verbal and verbal children with ASD aged 4;1-7;8, (MV=15, V=19). It examines remotely collected data to assess number of chews, number of swallows, duration of chewing cycles, and number of extraneous movements before swallowing; and relate these variables to language and motor skills.

Learning Objectives

  1. List two feeding and swallowing patterns in minimally verbal and verbal children with ASD
  2. Describe motor ability related to feeding and swallowing and its impact on verbal output
  3. Evaluate the effectiveness of operationalized definitions and observable characterizing features of feeding and swallowing, ASD

_____________________________________

Health-Related Quality of Life of Parents of Children with Pediatric Feeding Disorders

Pediatric feeding disorders (PFD) affects functioning and social participation of children. This presentation reports a study to evaluate the health-related quality of life of parents/ caregivers of children with PFD. The session highlights why and how healthcare systems should focus on parents/ families to improve outcomes for children with PFD.

Learning Objectives

  1. Summarize the overall impact of PFD on affected children and their families
  2. Describe the importance of understanding parents'/ caregivers' involvement in management of PFD
  3. List two strategies to support parents/ caregivers of children with PFD in intervention

_____________________________________

Feeding A Short Gut: A clinician/parent perspective

Short bowel syndrome (SBS) is a condition in which the body is unable to absorb nutrients from foods due to shortened or damaged bowel. As a mother of a child with short bowel syndrome and a speech-language-pathologist, Meagan Short offers a dual-perspective account of the feeding challenges associated with SBS.

Learning Objectives

  1. List two clinical implications of short bowel syndrome on feeding and swallowing
  2. Summarize the effects of incorporating family as an integral part of care teams
  3. Describe considerations of quality of life when addressing feeding of patients with complex diagnoses
speaker headshot

Ross Westemeyer, PhD, CCC-SLP
Northeastern University

speaker headshot

Jeanne Marshall, B Sp Path, PhD
Children's Health Queensland Hospital and Health Service & The University of Queensland; The Informed SLP

speaker headshot

Alaina Martens, MS, CCC-SLP
Northeastern University

speaker headshot

Meagan Short, CCC-SLP

speaker headshot

Elizabeth Curney, MS, OTR/L
St. Mary's Healthcare System for Children

speaker headshot

Michelle Beechamp, OTD, OTR/L
Desert Valley Pediatric Therapy

speaker headshot

Stephanie Waters, MS, CCC-SLP, CLC
St. Mary's Hospital for Children, NYU Langone, Therapy Insights, Adelphi University

speaker headshot

Emily Moran, SLP-CF
Massachusetts General Hospital

speaker headshot

Nadeesha Nimani, BSc Honours (SLP)
Wickramarachchi Hearing Care, Kadawatha, Sri Lanka

speaker headshot

Isuru Dharmarathna, PhD
KITE, Toronto Rehabilitation Research Institute, University Health Network, Canada

April 25, 2024 16:00

In August 2022, Feeding Matters hosted a Consensus Summit in partnership with Children's Healthcare of Atlanta and Emory University.  This summit brought leaders in the eating disorder and feeding disorder fields together to acknowledge the overlap of the two diagnoses, determine areas of consensus on how to use both diagnoses, and identify best opportunities for assessment. This session will be sharing the details from the Summit and provide insight for the future direction on how both fields can work together to support better outcomes for children. 

Learning Objectives

  1. Summarize the diagnostic criteria for ARFID and PFD
  2. List next steps based on a case study presentation 
  3. Identify one area of overlap between the eating disorder and feeding disorder fields that can be leveraged for future research

speaker headshot

Hayley Estrem. PhD, RN
University of North Carolina at Wilmington

speaker headshot

Pamela Dodrill, PhD
Brigham and Women’s Hospital

speaker headshot

Jennifer Thomas, PhD, FAED
Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School

speaker headshot

William Sharp, PhD
Emory University + Children’s Multidisciplinary Feeding Program

Day 3

April 26, 2024 09:00

The 2024 Symposium aims to outline the key components and strategies involved in the development of an educational pathway for pediatric feeding disorder (PFD). In recognizing the critical need for specialized education in this field, our pillar chairs, along with our director of strategic initiatives will have an open discussion with our PFD Alliance community about what opportunities are available within each pillar to best integrate a pathway and how to determine the optimal course of action when implementing education.  

During this unique live event participants will have the opportunity to share challenges and generate ideas through dynamic real-time interaction with other participants, leadership, and families. Participants will leave with new ideas and renewed motivation to move the system of care for PFD towards a brighter future.

Learning Objectives

1. Identify the audience that Feeding Matters can best influence access to and integrate a PFD educational pathway

2. Contrast current PFD educational pathways with actual provider needs and list 2 growth opportunities

3. Identify 2 opportunities for PFD curriculum integration in mainstream educational pathways

speaker headshot

Cuyler Romeo, MOT, OTR/L, SCFES, IBCLC
Feeding Matters

speaker headshot

Amy Delaney, PhD
Marquette University

speaker headshot

Paula Rabaey, PhD
University of Minnesota

speaker headshot

Erin Ross, PhD
Feeding Fundamentals

speaker headshot

Amber Mieras, FAC Chair, Parent of Child with PFD

speaker headshot

Nikhila Raol, MD, MPH, FAAP
Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta

April 26, 2024 10:30

ABA's Role in Feeding 101

Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) offers approaches for treating Pediatric Feeding Disorders (PFD) and Avoidant Restrictive Food Intake Disorder (ARFID). Sharing our evidence-based techniques, ABA can address feeding challenges in a lead or collaborative role. It’s comprehensive focus on the whole child ensures personalized interventions and enhancing overall treatment strategies.

Learning Objectives

1.Summarize the science and research that supports the use of ABA interventions for feeding

2. Apply principles to develop feeding interventions, enhance client dignity and promote positive outcomes

3. Identify two ABA strategies that can foster effective support aligned with the child's developmental needs

__________________________________

Harmonizing Feeding Therapy with Different Cognitive Developmental Stages in Pediatric Feeding Disorders

Delve into the interplay between cognitive developmental stages and effective feeding therapy for Pediatric Feeding Disorders. Explore Piaget's cognitive stages and their impact on feeding development, uncovering tailored strategies for optimal progress. Real-life case studies illuminate how therapists can adapt approaches across the lifespan.

Learning Objectives

1. Summarize the pivotal implications of a child’s developmental stage for feeding therapy strategies

2. Describe how a therapist’s approach and interactions are influenced by the child’s Cognitive Developmental stage

3. Identify two ways a child’s relationship with food shifts as they progress through the cognitive stages

_____________________________________________

Clinical Insights and Caregiver Voices: Home-Based Medically-Complex Tube Weaning

Discover a transformative approach to home-based pediatric tube weaning in a medically- complex case. Using a family-driven, responsive approach, we will address medical, nutritional, feeding skill, and psychosocial factors, including the importance of a multidisciplinary approach. Gain invaluable insights from real-life caregiver experiences and clinical expertise for compassionate, successful tube weaning.

Learning Objectives

1. Describe the importance of family-driven care in supporting functional outcomes for feeding therapy.

2. Relate caregiver experiences to current clinical practices to improve tube weaning approaches.

3. Define motor learning principles and their application to feeding and oral motor skills.

speaker headshot

Theresa Bartholomew, BCBA
Jade Behavioral Consultants

speaker headshot

Lindsay Beckerman, MOT, OTR/L
Developmental FX Toomey & Associates

speaker headshot

Kelly Fitzpatrick, CCC-SLP, CLC
Pediatric Gastroenterology Hepatology & Nutrition of Florida

speaker headshot

Brianna Miluk, MS, CCC-SLP, CLC
Pediatric Feeding Therapy, LLC & Contract employee with Earthshine Speech and Language

speaker headshot

Denise Clark, Parent of child with PFD

April 26, 2024 10:30

Virtual Family-Based Care for Avoidant/Restrictive Food Intake Disorder

There are limited treatment options for the feeding and eating disorder avoidant/restrictive food intake disorder. For other childhood eating and psychiatric disorders, family-based approaches to treatment are considered best practice; however accessibility is lacking. We describe a virtual approach to family-based care and evaluate treatment outcomes for this approach.

Learning Objectives

1. Explain the clinical presentation of avoidant/restrictive food intake disorder

2. Compare family based treatment approaches for avoidant/restrictive food intake disorder

3. Describe 16 week treatment outcomes for virtual family-based treatment for avoidant/restrictive food intake disorder

_____________________________________________

Meeting Halfway: A Multidisciplinary Approach to PFD Treatment in Children With Autism

Children with autism are at higher risk for restricted diets, gastrointestinal disorders, and familial stress than children who do not have autism. Through case studies and discussion of a collective, multidisciplinary model used by our feeding team, our team will highlight examples of positive feeding outcomes for this unique population.

Learning Objectives

1. Apply therapeutic techniques and strategies that address feeding challenges in children with autism

2. Summarize common gastrointestinal issues that relate to feeding difficulties in children with autism and management

3. Demonstrate how nutrition outcomes improve utilizing a multidisciplinary focus in children with PFD and autism

_____________________________________________

Addressing PFD in Neurodiverse Children in Schools: Success Stories and Lessons Learned

With a decade's experience as a school-based speech-language pathologist specializing in treating medically complex students, addressing Pediatric Feeding Disorders (PFD) in educational settings proves a formidable challenge. The case studies highlight collaborative efforts, obstacles encountered, and their influence on students' feeding outcomes.

Learning Objectives

1. List 3 challenges that SLPs encounter when addressing PFD in neurodiverse children within school settings

2. Describe three potential school-team related hindrances that may impede feeding/swallowing progress in students

3. Identify effective ways to foster interdisciplinary collaboration within the school-team, optimizing feeding and swallowing interventions

speaker headshot

Jessie Menzel, PhD
Equip Health

speaker headshot

Jessica Owens, CPNP-PC
UNC Health

speaker headshot

Emily Bragg, MS, CCC-SLP
UNC Health

speaker headshot

Sharon Wallace, RD, CSP, LDN
University of North Carolina Hospitals /UNC Children’s Hospital Chapel Hill NC

speaker headshot

Margaryta Kuzmin, MA, CCC-SLP, TSSLD-BE
NYC Department of Education (D75-Special Education) & Right Start Inc. Early Intervention

April 26, 2024 12:30

Research suggests that family readiness, mealtimes routines, bowel regimen, and sleep routines are associated with feeding outcomes. Addressing these areas is paramount when considering all four domains of PFD. This course will review how to address these areas to set the family unit up for long-term success.

Learning Objectives

1. List three factors that can impact a child’s progress in feeding therapy

2. Describe how to coach caregivers to prepare a child for success in feeding therapy

3. Implement strategies to address these areas in feeding therapy as they arise

speaker headshot

Kristine Perez, MS CCC-SLP
Orlando Health

speaker headshot

Jessica Martin, MS OTR/L, CLT, CLC
Orlando Health

speaker headshot

Stephanie Kern, MS OTR/L, CLC
Orlando Health

April 26, 2024 12:30

Blenderized formulas can play an important role in the nutrition support of children with PFD who require tube feeding. With increased prevalence of use, practitioners must be educated on appropriate use of these formulas and understand the pros and cons to make better decisions when selecting and using these formulas.

Learning Objectives

1. Summarize best practices for use of blenderized formulas

2. Formulate and implement a tube feeding plan using blenderized formula

3. Describe and analyze the nutrient content of blenderized formulas

speaker headshot

Liz Evenson, MS, RD, LD, CLC
Nationwide Children's Hospital

April 26, 2024 13:45

Interoception, the body’s perception, recognition, and response to internal cues, is a foundation for regulation of physiological functions. During this session, presenters will introduce interoception and discuss the impact of interoception on pediatric feeding. Case studies will be utilized to connect current literature to functional application for practitioners and families.

Learning Objectives

1. Describe interoception and list the complex body systems of perceiving, recognizing, and responding to internal cues

2. Examine the relationship between feeding and interoception in children with feeding challenges

3. Summarize the impact of interoception as an important factor during the assessment and treatment of pediatric feeding disorder

speaker headshot

Cassaundra Corbett Miller, EdD, MS, CCC/SLP
West Virginia University Center for Excellence in Disabilities

speaker headshot

Amy Kurowski-Burt, EdD, MOT, OTR/L
West Virginia University Center for Excellence in Disabilities

April 26, 2024 13:45

Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is an allergic condition that has rapidly transformed over the past 30 years from a case-reportable disease to a major cause of upper gastrointestinal morbidity in the United States.  In this talk, Dr. McGowan and Tegan Medico will first discuss the clinical presentation, epidemiology, and natural history of EoE.  They will then review emerging data on how EoE may be underdiagnosed, especially in populations with limited access to care.  Finally, they will provide an overview of the nutritional assessment in patients with EoE and highlight potential nutritional deficiencies.  

Learning Objectives

1. Summarize the clinical presentation and management of eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE)

2. Describe recent findings on the epidemiology of EoE in the U.S. Medicaid population

3. Identify the need for nutritional assessment in patients with EoE 

speaker headshot

Emily McGowan, MD, PhD
University of Virginia School of Medicine

speaker headshot

Tegan Medico, MS, MPH, RDN, CNSC
University of Virginia Health

April 26, 2024 15:00

Feeding Characteristics and Behaviors in Young Children with Food Allergies

Preliminary data collected from three major allergy clinics will be presented regarding the feeding characteristics and behaviors of young children (6mths-4;11) with food allergies. The children were categorized into three age groups (6-18 months, 19-35 months, 36-59 months) and any similarities and differences found between the groups will be discussed.

Learning Objectives

1. Summarize feeding characteristics in children with food allergies

2. Describe the impacts of food allergies on feeding

3. Identify feeding characteristics relating to food allergies

_____________________________________________

A Model for PFD Education in SLP Graduate Students: Knowledge and Skills

Families with children who have PFD seek professional support for intervention. However, formal education in PFD is provided in less than 1⁄4 of SLP graduate programs. The purpose of this presentation is to share development and implementation of formal academic and clinical education of SLP graduate students specific to PFD.

Learning Objectives

1. Summarize the gap and potential need for PFD education in SLP graduate programs

2. Describe a model of content knowledge education of SLP students related to PFD

3. List two characteristics of a model of clinical education of SLP students related to PFD

_____________________________________________

Factors Associated with Thickened Feedings and its Impact at 1-2 Months Post-Term

This prospective, descriptive study of 46 infants from a level III neonatal intensive care unit that uses thickening as a feeding strategy will provide evidence of who receives thickened milk feedings, and when, and the impact of thickening milk on infants, parents, and their families in their early months post-discharge.

Learning Objectives

1. Identify characteristics of infants prescribed thickened oral milk prior to discharge from neonatal intensive care

2. Describe parent and family outcomes of thickening milk feedings at 1-2 months post-term age

3. Summarize parent and family outcomes of thickening milk feedings at 1-2 months post-term age

___________________________________________

FEEDS: A Transdisciplinary Approach to Navigating Early Childhood Feeding Challenges

FEEDS programming, led by a child developmental specialist and a dietitian, provides virtual nutrition, behavior, and development guidance and support for children up to age five with feeding differences, challenging mealtime behaviors, and growth concerns. In this presentation we will discuss the format, successes, and challenges of FEEDS programming.

Learning Objectives

1. Identify 3 common nutrition- and behavioral-related concerns families have regarding feeding their children

2. Summarize the relationship between caregiver stress levels and pediatric feeding and mealtime behavior challenges

3. Describe how the FEEDS program supports caregivers of children with feeding challenges

_____________________________________________

The Effectiveness of a 12 week Feeding Program Emphasizing Parental-Clinician Collaboration

Pediatric feeding disorders affect more than 1 in 37 children under the age of 5 in the United States yearly resulting in unpleasant mealtime experiences. Feeding programs are difficult to access. As a result, children do not receive the necessary intervention impeding nutrition, development, growth and overall well being.

Learning Objectives

1. Analyze the impact of a 12-week feeding intervention program, on feeding skills, addressing  sensory responsiveness, oral motor skills, mealtime experiences, oral hygiene(toothbrushing), and parental education in children with developmental disabilities and feeding disorders.

2. Summarize the importance of parent-clinician collaboration during feeding intervention programs

3. Describe two benefits of oral hygiene (toothbrushing) in feeding interventions in children with developmental disabilities and feeding disorders

_____________________________________________

Screening For Pediatric Feeding Disorder, Identifying patients at risk for PFD at the Pediatrician’s office

The need for early identification of pediatric feeding disorder (PFD) to prevent further or future disability is known, however screening practices are not well established. This talk shares lessons learned from a pilot study conducted at a local pediatrician’s office exploring the feasibility of screening for PFD using the ICFQ 6-question screener.

Learning Objectives

1. List two opportunities to expand the referral landscape for children with PFD.

2. Describe two symptoms of children and families at risk for PFD

3. Summarize the steps needed to conduct a pilot study for PFD screening. 

speaker headshot

Jennifer Kefford, MSLP
NSW Health

speaker headshot

Cindy Lund, PhD, CCC-SLP, C/NDT
Concordia University Wisconsin

speaker headshot

Ida Barresi, MA, CCC-SLP
Rose F. Kennedy Center Children's Evaluation & Rehabilitation Center at Montefiore

speaker headshot

Suzanne Thoyre, PhD, RN, FAAN
University of North Carolina

speaker headshot

Isabella Herold, MPH, RDN, CDN, CLC
Community Healthcare Network

speaker headshot

Nazish Pervez, RD, CDN, CLC
Community Healthcare Network

speaker headshot

Anya Holit-Gsell, LMSW
Community Healthcare Network

speaker headshot

Madeleine Amdur, LCSW, MPH
Community Healthcare Network

speaker headshot

Lauren Hamilton, MD Student, Class of 2026
Student: U of Arizona College of Medicine Phoenix

Thank you to all of our Sponsors!

The IPFDC is Presented by: